What is egd surgery

Is EGD considered surgery?

EGD is an endoscopic procedure that allows your doctor to examine your esophagus, stomach and duodenum (part of your small intestine). EGD is an outpatient procedure, meaning you can go home that same day. It takes approximately 30 to 60 minutes to perform.

How is a EGD performed?

EGD Test (Esophagogastroduodenoscopy) EGD (Esophagogastroduodenoscopy) is a procedure that examines the esophagus, stomach and first portion of the duodenum (small intestine) using a long flexible tube with a camera at the end of it. The scope is inserted into the mouth and advanced to the small intestine.

Is an EGD painful?

You should feel no pain and not remember the procedure. A local anesthetic may be sprayed into your mouth to prevent you from coughing or gagging when the scope is inserted. A mouth guard is used to protect your teeth and the scope.

Do they put you to sleep for an endoscopy?

All endoscopic procedures involve some degree of sedation, which relaxes you and subdues your gag reflex. Being sedated during the procedure will put you into a moderate to deep sleep, so you will not feel any discomfort when the endoscope is inserted through the mouth and into the stomach.

What diseases can be detected by an endoscopy?

Upper GI endoscopy can be used to identify many different diseases:

  • gastroesophageal reflux disease.
  • ulcers.
  • cancer link.
  • inflammation, or swelling.
  • precancerous abnormalities such as Barrett’s esophagus.
  • celiac disease.
  • strictures or narrowing of the esophagus.
  • blockages.

What type of doctor does an endoscopy?

Most often, a gastroenterologist will do an upper endoscopy in a doctor’s office, GI clinic, or hospital. A gastroenterologist is a doctor who specializes in the GI tract. Many other specialists can perform an upper endoscopy as well.

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What is difference between EGD and endoscopy?

An upper endoscopy is routine procedure to examine the lining of the upper part of your gastrointestinal tract. Also known as esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD), it examines the esophagus, stomach, and the beginning part of your small intestines (duodenum).

How safe is EGD procedure?

In general, an EGD is a safe procedure. There’s a very slight risk that the endoscope will cause a small hole in your esophagus, stomach, or small intestine. If a biopsy is performed, there’s also a small risk of prolonged bleeding from the site where the tissue was taken.

How long after EGD can you eat?

Over the next 24-48 hours, eat small meals consisting of soft, easily-digestible foods like soups, eggs, juices, pudding, applesauce, etc. You should also avoid consuming alcohol for at least 24 hours after your procedure. When you feel like you’re “back to normal,” you may resume your normal diet.

How bad is an endoscopy?

An endoscopy is usually a safe procedure, and the risk of serious complications is very low. Rare complications include: an infection in a part of the body the endoscope is used to examine – this may require treatment with antibiotics.

What anesthesia is used for endoscopy?

First, although the depth of sedation during these procedures is similar to general anesthesia, the airway is largely unprotected. Used as a sedative, propofol, the most popular agent used for these procedures has a narrow therapeutic window-transiting from mild sedation to deep general anesthesia rapidly.

Are you asleep for colonoscopy?

The Procedure

You’ll lie on your left side on an exam table, and you’ll likely fall asleep. The doctor will insert the colonoscope into your rectum and pump air into the colon to get a better view of your colon’s lining.

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Can you breathe during endoscopy?

There is no obstruction to breathing during the procedure, and patients breathe normally throughout the examination. All patients are closely monitored during the procedure including oxygenation, pulse rate, blood pressure, and will receive oxygen supplementation through the nose throughout the examination.

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